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religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> a discussion on climate science and politics. paul by director of nasa's goddard institute of space studies. another look at religion and politics. tomorrow, we are joined by the indiana rep. he will talk about the 113th congress in his priorities. join us sunday at 10:00 eastern and again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> as president obama begins his second term, what is the most important issue? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, make a video about your message to the president. is your chance to win $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next a discussion on climate science, politics, and global warming. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here. welcome. seven years ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 201
, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to bring our values and to it.
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
the tribute to the orioles, sponsoring part of the display. >>> the science center celebrating the new year at the other 12:00. hosting the 5th annual midnight noon celebration. the ball drops at high noon, the party continues until 2:00 in the afternoon. midnight noon activities are free with a paid admission to the mailed science center. >>> hagerstown teenager who died this year in a single car crash will be honored as part of a float tomorrow. hoover died in march and the 17- year-old's family donated organs, the float will feature er a picture of hoover made out of plant materials. his parents will be going to california to decorate the float. his organs saved three lives. marylanders in summer set affected by sandy will be eligible to receive food stamps under an aid program announced sunday, president barack obama designated the county as a disaster area, eligible for assistance, providing one month of benefits to survivors. storm victims can apply from january 7th through the 13th at the department of social services and disaster recovery center in chrisfield. time for a check of th
reproduction system. [laughter] a lecture by tied a can and a member of the house committee on science and technology is the guy than there was a theory that on me just was not a good candidate and did not connect very well and was somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan and said trees were the right to heighth. the actual quote was a love this state. it seems right that the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees in that please. no trees as such a perfect height as these. can never be at ease with trees that grow higher than one's knees or too high to splinter in the breeze. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i trie
nation," we love a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury award for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of my favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon. and it will be american. >> it seems to me, first of all, from what i understand from doctors, that's really rare. if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> i stood up and said the science is bogus. the dangers of carbon dioxide? tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one person. and it goes to newt gingrich for his out-of-this-world ideas. congratulations, newt. your revvie will be waiting for you at the moon base when you get there. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, and carl rove. plus, the award for political performer of the year. you're watching the second annual revvie awards only on msnbc. jamie
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of miff favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon and it will be american. >> first of all, if it's a legitimate rape, the fe plael body has ways to shut that whole thing double. >> the dangers of carbon dioxide. tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one pirn and it's to newt gingrich. congr congratulatio congratulations, newt. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, carl rove, plus the award for pli political performer of the year. [ thunder crashes ] [ male announcer ] if you think all batteries are the same... consider this: when the unexpected happens, there's one brand of battery more emergency workers trust in their maglites: duracell. one reason: duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. g
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
at a letter sense out today by committee of science, space and technology, they are talking about a man in department of energy, running the loan gar abty program who was using private e-mail accounts and office of science and technology, technology officer there conducting business with a private e-mail account, how widespread do you believe this is? >> you have to say how many places is this the being used. and there is no doubt that people are trying to use it to avoid compliance with the freedom of information act. that is absolutely unacceptable. we have to find out how widespreaddis it. how many accounts are being used. different accounts traps a number -- perhaps a number of accounts by the same person, we have to assure this is not being used to avoid compliance with the law, transparency is for important not only to us but to american citizens this is not done, that is something we're not going to let go of until we get to the bottom of it. tom. i hope not, people said why are people not held accountable for their actions? are -- forgive me, i do not know the procedure or theel
to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into this video from the british and arctic survey shows that backbreaking effort by 12 scientists and engineers trying to drill through the ice. with bare hands on steel, the mission depended on hot water being blasted down into the ice to open the routes to an ancient lake. from a tiny camp on the ice, it was to explore at the limits of our eyes was possible. the goal was to drill down of two miles to reach the waters below. the drilling went wrong. it did not get deeper. but hot water leaked into the ice around. it was a major blow to a daring project. huge quantities of snow were malted, heated up, sterilized. this team just not work. >> the pace was slower than we had planned for. we did not have enough fuel to get to the service of the lake. we are extremely disappointed by that outcome. >> the drilling was not the only problem, just before christmas, a vital spare part had to be flown out all the way from britain. in the end, three years of planning and 8 million pounds have drawn a blank. they might try again. for now, the lak
's. he and his wife sylvia began program making in the 1950's. it was when he combined science- fiction with puppetry that he achieved his most famous creations. the pilot was commissioned for 321 our programs. -- 32 one hour programs. >> he said it was not day television series. and then he walked all the way up to me and said, this is a feature film. >> stingray was the first-ever british children's series to be filmed in color. >> anything can happen in the next half hour. >> capt. scarlet featured more realistic puppets and darker situations. this was the last of his series to be made with his puppet the technique. >> 20 kilometers away. >> one character remains closest to his heart. >> my favorite character was parker. >> he will be remembered as a man who entertained adults and children, using mechanical puppets, which still produce stories filled with emotion and excitement. >> matt zimmerman was the voice of allen tracy, the blond one. he played him, he did the voice. we spoke to him earlier and he told me more about his relationship with jerry anderson. >> he was an amazing man
carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered from the christmas eve heist are worth over $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square but folks in lisburn, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve the town drops yellow britches in honor of the yellow breeches creek. creative. >>> organizers in southern california applied the finishing touches to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go. you can watch that entire parade on nbc. >>> in nebraska, folks have a unique way of getting rid of the holiday, treat the fruitcake. the fruitcake filleting. people of all ages jumps at the chance, nice arm, to chuck the unwanted christmas gifts. >>> now for entertainment news. what's the new year without a psy update? he rang in the new year at times square telling jay gray he might be ready to move on from gangnam style. >> i cannot just, you know, stay here. i got to move forward. i'm working on a new thing. but if i keep doing this and
. >> host: political science professor steven frantzich, the most recent book "oops: observing our politicians stumble," i had to double check that. how many books have you written? what's the topics? >> guest: well, this is 17 of original books, start counting the second editions, it's 27, but always lie with statistics. i started out all academic, time in the trenches, doing academic books, textbooks, last five or six books are more fun kinds of books. the one just prior to this, i did one called honored guests profiling all of the people, the presidents mentioned in the state of the union message. today, we're used to that, a president pointing up and using it somewhat as app example. that was not done until roomed reagan did it for the first, you know, for the first time, and every president since then used the people as an example of their political goals and their sorts of philosophies so i had fun with that one. close to home, i did a bigg of brian lamb. i did work, and they said what is the real brine lamb like? he did not want a biography done. i pumped him and pumped him,
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
in the christian science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures o
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. yeah we both relieve coughs, sneezing, aches, fevers. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> we're following breaking news tonight. it's a medical condition of secretary of state hillary clinton. hillary clinton is in a new york city hospital where she will remain for the next few days. doctors found a blood clot during a medical exam related to her concussion a few weeks ago. they want to keep her at new york presbyterian hospital for observations. >>> 26 hours before the fiscal cliff deadline and for now, lawmakers have hit an impasse. what happens if no deal is reached? specifically, how much would you pay in taxes? there's a calculator online to help you figure that out. we have a breakdown. >> if you want to have a sense of how the fiscal cliff could askts -- ask -- affect you specifically, in terms of how much more you
look at a science story that captured headlines this year. the federal government has taken new steps to limit some of the research it does with chimpanzees, which have long been the source of hope and debate. but questions remain about whether those experiments should occur under any circumstances. "newshour" science correspondent miles o'brien reports. >> reporter: there are no other animals quite like them, except us. they share 99% of our d.n.a. and it shows. they scheme, plot and fight. they care for their babies and they grieve their dead. and they love a good game of catch. as i discovered, queenie had little patience for my wild pitches. >> did you see her stomp her foot? >> reporter: she's very mad at me. those very similarities are at the core of a heated debate over whether scientists should keep using chimpanzees for scientific and medical research. do we owe our cousins something more? here, they say we do. welcome to chimp haven, near shreveport louisiana, a 200-acre oasis of tall trees and hidden daily treats for about 130 chimpanzees. haven co-founder amy fultz put me
know science mismatch is a problem, that although blacks are more likely than whites to nature when they go to college, they're much less like you to get stem degrees, science engineering that degrees if they receive preference. university of virginia found to be taped to blacks or two students of any color, one who receives a preference, one who doesn't, the preference is a 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on this path through. mismatch also affects academic inclined students who receive much preferences for that to become university professors are going to academics someday. predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class in the side economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california were voters passed proposition 209 a large cause a natural experiment of what happens when preferences are banned from entire university system. the results aren't extremely curt for anyone who bothers to look. but then i have to nurse at implementation of research quality, the number of blacks in the university of california system
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
have more gun violence. >> reporter: but a 2004 report by the national academy of science found that guns likely to be used in crimes were unlikely to be turned in at gun buybacks. the mayor says since 2009, los angeles has collected 8,000 guns at buybacks, a period in which violent crime in the city has dropped by 33%. >> this is part of a much bigger effort, a comprehensive effort to address gun and gang violence. and like i said, in the city of l.a., the proof is in the pudding. >> reporter: the line of cars stretched for six blocks as people waited up to three hours to turn in their guns. >> me turning my rifles in now is my sympathy card to connecticut. >> reporter: so many people are bringing their guns in here that l.a.p.d. officials say this is likely to be their most successful buyback ever. they expect to collect more than 2,500 guns before it's over. >> axelrod: john blackstone in los angeles, thank you. a sad sight here in new york today in a place that's seen its share of trouble lately. an endangered finback whale washed up alive on the beach oh the breezy point se
his testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro
research has been done, published in excellent journals. so we now know that science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are ext
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
. the study was published in the journal of food science. lunchbreak is next. a lean sandwich packed with flavor. we're cooking with the co-founders of "tom and eddie's". this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. hello, i'm alex trebek. for over 10 years now, i've been representing the colonial penn life insurance company and i'm here today to talk with some of their insurance representatives about their guaranteed acceptance life insurance. that was a really good point. hi, alex. hi, everyone. i thought it'd be interesting to hear from you what your customers say are some of the things they like best about colonial penn's whole life insurance. who's gonna start? well, it's guaranteed acceptance for people over age 50. they don't have to take a physical or answer any health questions. and it
for a world in which science fiction is rapidly becoming science fact. >> we were put here to to touch, to smell, to taste, to see and to hear the universe. that's a great role. that's a great responsibility. >> osgood: it took more than just rocket fuel to propel sally ride into orbit. as america's first woman in space, she was a role model for those who dream of shooting for the stars. earl scruggs, he aimed high. his picking elevated the five-string bang owe from second fiddle status to star of the show. ♪ (andy griffith theme). >> reporter: no doubt you remember this tune. andy griffiths' may bury recalled our own hometowns as we remember them or wish they could have been. >> if you ever come by this way again, be sure and stop by. i hope you have more time though. we don't like to see folks hurrying through like this. >> osgood: he was something of a friend, one we'll remember for a long time to come. so long, andy. ♪ at last ♪ my love has come >> osgood: we leave it to you, the great etta james to close out our tribute to those who left us in 2012. we only wish we had a bit
out of the equal protects clause that depends on social science evidence. and i think if the social science evidence is indeterminant, which it is, then we shouldn't be discriminating against people on the basis of race. >> roger, could i -- >> stuart -- >> quick point on s.t.e.m. grads. our point on s.t.e.m. grads isn't that we need more of them, maybe we do. our point is that when students, black or hispanic students go to college wanting to be s.t.e.m. majors, they should not be misled to go to colleges where they have very little chance of becoming s.t.e.m. majors. >> okay. the gentleman up here in the blue shirt. >> greg squires from george washington university. and previous board member of the woodstock institute where mr. sander was at for a while. i have a simple question for roger clegg. you gave us some numbers on the percentage of people born out of wedlock of various groups. what do you think accounts for those patterns? >> well, that's a very interesting question. and i'll tell you one thing that i think momentum account for it -- i think doesn't account for it. i don'
of science, 50, 100 and 150 years from now. thank you so much for being with us from new york city this morning. guest: it's my pleasure. host: we now go to the floor of house of representatives. that's all for "washington journal" this morning. the house is in for morning hour and at noon for legislative usiness. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. january 2, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable david rivera to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists smithed by the majority and minority leaders -- submitted by majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and minority whip limited to five minutes e
today. she was treated sunday for a blood clot. more from nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
in debates in school and college, they are often rather more about style than sub science. sometimes they appear to miss the point entirely. i remember at the student union, i was president once, we had a motion which instructed the united states to remove its troops instructed the united states that is a bit of big ask. here in this place, debates are different. debates have consequences. the most significant speeches are not necessarily the most stylish or the most fluid. they are the ones born of knowledge, of passion, of commit, and of concern. most of all, they are made by those who are here not only to speak for themselves, but to represent the people. todayed that is your opportunity, to speak out, based on your convictions and concerns to speak for young people whom you represent. and to speak out on issues which are relevant and where you can exert an influence inspect doing so, it will be in the best tradition of parliament democracy. before i finish, can i pay tribute to the administrate colleague. the administrate of children and families who is responsible for improving
. that is in the art, science times, style -- it means basically telling you how to live. when it becomes cultural criticism, it is telling you what opera to go to or whether "the nutcracker" is good. it turns out we know from surveys that people read a great deal more about health than they used to. people are reading the newspaper to find out how to take care when your elderly parents -- what happens when your foot falls asleep, if you go to a place 15,000 feet high you should take pills because somebody might drop dead, which happens to one of my colleagues. people are reading more for that. that is what they call value added journalism -- i call it how to live journalism. one thing about these extra sesections -- to sell something other than the record. -- the "times" used to have one page a week. one page a week. now think about the "times" and what it is -- it is highly different. the other thing they're doing better -- cultural criticism. i talked about with one member of the audience -- cultural criticism used to be really what might be called culture in new york. now it is every kind of c
, no matter how wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> getting close to the bottom of the hour, we want to get you a look at the headlines right now. hillary clinton has been hospitalized. this after doctors discovered a blood clot. the former first lady had been cleared to go back to work when doctors made the discovery. she suffered icon cushion after fainting a couple weeks ago. she had a nasty stomach virus and collapsed from dehydration. we have a live report coming up in a couple minutes. >>> the other big story is the action or inaction on capitol hill. lawmakers do not reach a fiscal cliff agreement, could you see your taxes skyrocket and deep spending cuts kick in. major spending cuts entitlements and tax increases. house republicans have ended their meetings for the night. we'll find out tomorrow whether they've made any progress in their talks. any deal would have to get enough votes to pass the senate and the house. president obama says sandy hook school shooting was the worst day o
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. we can live without the &. restore revive rejuvenate rebuild rebuild rebuild >>> more breaking news now. the senate late tonight approving a $60.4 billion bill to rebuild after superstorm sandy. now, it goes to the house, but if both chambers fail to agree on a package before the current congressional term expires, then everyone will have to start again from scratch. >>> keeping them honest, this has been the least productive congress in modern history. at last count, a little more than 200 bills enacted. by comparison, the 80th congress, which then-president harry truman called the do-nothing congress, it managed to pass 906 bills into law. think about that as you watch the next report about one of the few things lawma
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> mike: from paint to pet food, hats to barbecue. as a nation, we make millions of products every year. but have you ever wondered just how those things are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in america" we go to towns small and large to meet unique businesses building jobs and profits. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." good evening, i'm mike hegedus with an n.b.r. special edition, made in america. walking down kentucky street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where sm
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